General Information

Instructors and Class Meetings

Instructor E-mail Class Time Class Location Office Hours
Irina Bobkova ibobkova@ur.rochester.edu TR 9:40-10:55 AM Lattimore 201 Hylan 801
T 2 – 4
Andrew Bridy abridy@ur.rochester.edu MW 2:00-3:15 PM Bausch & Lomb 109 Hylan 1001
M 12 – 1
F 1 – 3
John Doyle john.doyle@rochester.edu MWF 10:25-11:15 AM Bausch & Lomb 109 Hylan 1019
M 1 – 2
Th 3 – 4:30
Kyle Hambrook hambrook@math.ubc.ca TR 3:25-4:40 PM Hutchison 140 Hylan 905
W 2 – 4
Saul Lubkin lubkin@math.rochester.edu MWF 9:00-9:50 AM Morey 501 Hylan 705
MF, 10:05-11:00AM
Brendan Murphy murphy@math.rochester.edu TR 4:50-6:05 PM Dewey 2162 Hylan 1103
W 3 – 5
Th 3:30 – 4:30

Teaching Assistants and Recitations

Workshop TAs E-Mail Workshop Time Workshop Location Office Hours
John Buckley jbuckle3@u.rochester.edu W 12:30 – 1:45 PM Hylan 203 Starbucks
(Wilson Commons)
M 3:30 – 4:30
F 12:30 – 1:45 PM Hylan 1101
Nikolaos
Chatzikonstantinou
nchatzik@ur.rochester.edu T 4:50 – 6:05 PM Hylan 1101 Hylan 910
F 6 – 7
F 10:25 – 11:40 AM Hylan 202
F 11:50 AM – 1:05 PM Hylan 101
Alex Cove acove@u.rochester.edu W 3:25 – 4:40 PM Hylan 1101 Rettner Hall
(computer lab; 2nd floor)
W 1 – 2
R 7:40 – 8:55 PM Hylan 201
Shouman Das sdas13@ur.rochester.edu T 12:30 – 1:45 PM Hylan 1101 Hylan 713
T 6 – 7
R 11:05 AM – 12:20 PM Hylan 1104
R 12:30 – 1:45 PM Hylan 1101
Sangzi Gao sgao6@u.rochester.edu W 2 – 3:15 PM Hylan 1106B Carlson Library
R 2 – 3
Evelyn Greaux egreaux@u.rochester.edu T 4:50 – 6:05 PM Hylan 203 Carlson Library
F 2 – 3
R 6:15 – 7:30 PM Hylan 1101
Blake Harriman bharrima@u.rochester.edu T 3:25 – 4:40 PM Hylan 1104 Rettner
(3rd floor)
M 4:30 – 5:30
Akif Hosain ahosain@u.rochester.edu T 6:15 – 7:30 PM Meliora 224 Carlson Library
W 12:50 – 1:50
Alyssa Loveall aloveall@u.rochester.edu T 11:05 AM – 12:20 PM Hylan 1104 Hylan 706
M 3 – 4
T 2 – 3:15 PM Hylan 1106B
Kathy Luo jluo12@u.rochester.edu T 9:40 – 10:55 AM Hylan 1106B Carlson Library
M 2 – 3
Jonathan Passant jpassant@ur.rochester.edu T 12:30 – 1:45 PM Hylan 1106B Hylan 710
W 4 – 5
W 2 – 3:15 PM Hylan 1104
W 6:15 – 7:30 PM Hylan 201
Karan Vombatkere kvombatk@u.rochester.edu R 2 – 3:15 PM Hylan 1104 Bausch & Lomb
(POA; 3rd floor)
W 1 – 2
R 3:25 – 4:40 PM Hylan 1101
Fuya Xu fxu9@u.rochester.edu T 6:15 – 7:30 PM Dewey 4126 Carlson Library
M 6 – 7
WeBWorK TAs E-Mail Office Hours
Mark Auden mauden@u.rochester.edu Bausch & Lomb 374
Sun. 3:30 – 4:30
Apolline Jungels ajungels@u.rochester.edu Carlson Library
Sat. 11:45 – 12:45
Note: Office hours of all TAs are open to all students taking the course, regardless of which recitation they are registered for.

Textbook

Calculus: Early Transcendentals, 8th Edition by James Stewart

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Course Description

Math 161 is designed to provide a detailed introduction to the fundamental ideas of calculus. It does not assume any prior calculus knowledge, but the student is expected to be proficient working with functions and their graphs as well as manipulating expressions involving variables and solving equations using algebra. There will be a short review of algebra, trigonometry, and precalculus, but students are expected to have a basic understanding of Chapter 1 and Appendices A, B, and D in the book.

Throughout most of this course, we will work to solve the following problem:

    Given a changing quantity, how do you calculate the exact rate of change of that quantity at a given point in time?

    Or, equivalently:

    Given a curve in the cartesian plane, what is the slope of the curve at any given point?

In order to solve this, we will first cover the notion of limits, as this is necessary for understanding the definition of the instantaneous rate of change, or derivative. We'll then move on to the definition of the derivative. Even though we will learn many rules to simplify the task of calculating derivatives, there will be many times that you will be expected to use the limit definition in order to calculate the derivative of a function. We will also cover the standard applications of derivatives, including answering the above question, and all the derivative rules. During the last few weeks of the semester, we'll move on to answering the next big question in calculus, the area question:

    Given a curve in the cartesian plane, what is the area under the curve?

In order to solve this question, we will again use limits in approximating the area under the curve. This will lead us to the definition of the integral and then we'll relate it back to the derivative using the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus. We'll cover only a few methods of calculating integrals; other methods will be saved for Calculus IIA (MTH 162).

Course Objectives

At the end of this semester, you should be able to:

• Calculate limits of functions; explain the relationship between a function and its graph and its limit at a point.
• Define a derivative using limits and explain the geometric significance; evaluate derivatives of a given function.
• Apply the concepts of limits and derivatives to real-world problems and sketching curves.
• Analyze the connection between derivatives and integrals in the context of the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus.
• Evaluate basic integrals using antiderivatives and substitution; recognize the geometric significance of an integral.
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Course Policies

Academic Integrity

Students are expected to abide by the University of Rochester Academic Honesty Policy, available at www.rochester.edu/college/honesty.

All academic work should be done with the high level of honesty and integrity that this University demands. Academic misconduct of any kind may result in a grade penalty or the assignment of a failing grade.

Attendance

You are expected to be in class every day and come prepared to learn and work. There will be no make-up exams, except in unavoidable circumstances, in which case you must provide sufficient written documentation to your instructor. If you know you will be absent on the day of an exam, let your instructor know at least a week in advance and he/she will arrange for you to take it at another time.

Reading

On the course schedule, note that we have included readings — sections you should read before coming to class that day. Reading the book and preparing for lecture ahead of time will help you follow the lecture better, complete your homework, and succeed in the workshops and on exams.

Homework

There will be weekly (online) WeBWorK homework assignments that will count for your grade. WeBWorK assignments will be due every Saturday at 5:00PM. WeBWorK Set 0 is meant as an introduction to WeBWorK and will not count for a grade.

Your initial login for WeBWorK is your Rochester email username and your password is your student ID number.

Even though the WeBWorK is due only every Saturday, you should be working on it throughout the week to ensure you are keeping up with the material. There is a WeBWorK TA that you can email if you need some help on a problem; however, you should not expect them to check their email at unreasonable hours, so make sure you get your questions in early! You should also make sure you ask detailed questions so that they can provide you with a thorough answer (i.e., don't just say, "I'm stuck.").

Collaborating with other students enrolled in the course is encouraged, but make sure you are submitting your own answers. Using electronic aids or submitting a friend's answers will not help you succeed in this course!

There will be a total of roughly 280 WeBWorK problems over the course of the semester, each worth one point. However, your final homework grade will be computed out of 240 points instead of 280. (Any score above 240 points will earn 100%.) For this reason, extensions for WeBWorK will not be granted under any circumstances.

There will also be homework problems assigned from the textbook and listed in the Course Schedule. Students are expected to complete these problems even though they are not handed in.

To log in to WeBWorK: Your username is your NetID (the part of your e-mail address before the "@"), and your password is your 8-digit student ID number. You should change your password after you log in for the first time.

Workshops

Workshops will meet once a week. These will involve worksheets related to material covered each week in lecture. The problems on these worksheets will generally be more difficult than problems on the homework or examples in class. Instead of doing routine calculations, you will be asked to analyze and explain in a small group. The questions will aim to get you to think more deeply about the material you are learning in class. You are responsible for signing up for and attending your weekly workshop.

You will be expected to turn in worksheets. They will be graded based on completion and overall effort and count for 10% of your final grade. Therefore, you cannot skip around to other workshops. You should sign up for the one that best fits your schedule and stick to that one! You may only be excused for a workshop if you have documented evidence. Contact your instructor if you have documentation for an excuse or your schedule has changed and you need to switch workshops permanently.

You will work in a small group on the worksheets and will turn in one set of solutions per group. The point of these workshops is to spend 75 minutes discussing and thinking about the material taught in class. This should help you solidify your own understanding of the material, as well as that of your peers. Explaining a topic to others is one of the best ways to learn the material! Therefore, you will not be graded on correct answers, but instead you'll be graded individually depending on your total engagement and effort in the workshop. The grading will be based on the following 0-2 point scale:

  1. 0 if the student was absent.
  2. 1 if the student was not engaged, pulled out their phone or computer during the session, or was late to the recitation.
  3. 2 if the student was engaged the entire period, actively working on the problems, and made progress on most of the problems.

At the end of the semester, your lowest two workshop scores will be dropped to account for absences.

Workshop sign-ups will be on Blackboard. The sign-ups will open Wednesday, September 2, 2015 at 7:00 p.m. More information regarding workshop sign-up may be found here.

Exams

There will be two midterms throughout the semester and one final exam. All exams will be closed-book; however, you will be allowed a single 3 in. by 5 in. index card with formulas. No calculators or other electronic devices will be allowed.

Exam Date Time Location
Midterm 1 Tuesday, October 13 8:00 – 9:15 AM Bobkova, Bridy, Hambrook: Hutchison 141
Doyle: Hutchison 140
Lubkin, Murphy: Meliora 203
Midterm 2 Thursday, November 12 8:00 – 9:15 AM Bobkova, Bridy, Hambrook: Hutchison 141
Doyle: Hutchison 140
Lubkin, Murphy: Meliora 203
Final Exam Tuesday, December 15 4:00 – 7:00 PM Bobkova, Bridy, Doyle: Hutchison 141
Hambrook: Hutchison 140
Lubkin, Murphy: Meliora 203

Note to Students with Disabilities

It is University of Rochester policy to provide reasonable accommodations to students who have a documented disability that may affect their ability to participate in course activities or to meet course requirements. Students with disabilities are encouraged to contact the College's Center for Excellence in Teaching and Learning (CETL) and their instructors for a confidential discussion of their individual need for academic accommodations. CETL is located in 1-154 Dewey Hall.

Please notify your instructor of any need for accommodations as early as possible.

Grades

The course grades will be calculated based on the following weights:

WeBWorK 20%
Workshops 10%
Midterm 1 20%
Midterm 2 20%
Final Exam 30%

The final exam will be cumulative and will test material from the entire semester. It will contain two parts, one containing material from the first two midterms, the other containing material covered after the second midterm. Each student's lowest midterm score will be replaced by that student's score on the first part of the final exam if the latter score is better than the original midterm's score. There will be no make-up exams. (See the Attendance section above.)

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Tentative Course Schedule

Week of Text to read Topic Supplementary
Problems
Workshops WeBWorK
Due Saturday at 5 PM
Aug 31 First day of classes is Monday, August 31
App. A Numbers, Inequalities, and Absolute Values App. A 11, 13, 21, 33, 44, 51 No workshops this week WeBWorK Set 0
Introduction to WeBWorK
(Due Sat, Sept 12, at 5 PM)
App. B Coordinate Geometry and Lines App. B 3, 9, 23, 29, 34, 35, 45, 51, 57
App. D Trigonometry App. D 3, 9, 13, 23, 25, 65, 67
Sept 7 Labor Day: Monday, September 7
No classes
1.3 New Functions from Old Functions 1.3 3, 29, 32, 39, 41, 43, 50 App. A, B, D WeBWorK Set 1
App. A, B, D
1.4 Exponential Functions 1.4 7, 12, 15, 17, 29abc
Sept 14 1.5 Inverse Functions and Logarithms 1.5 21, 23, 25, 35, 38, 49 1.3, 1.4 WeBWorK Set 2
1.3, 1.4
2.1 The Tangent and Velocity Problems 2.1 3, 5
2.2 The Limit of a Function 2.2 1, 3, 5, 9, 11, 15, 25, 31
Sept 21 2.3 Calculating Limits Using the Limit Laws 2.3 1, 10, 11 - 23 (odd), 35, 37, 57, 63 1.5, 2.1, 2.2 WeBWorK Set 3
1.5, 2.1, 2.2
2.5 Continuity 2.5 3, 17, 20, 39, 43, 45, 47, 50
2.6 Limits at Infinity; Horizontal Asymptotes 2.6 3, 5, 13 - 31 (odd), 63
Sept 28 2.7 Derivatives and Rates of Change 2.7 5, 9, 11, 15, 17, 27, 29, 47 2.3, 2.5, 2.6 WeBWorK Set 4
2.3, 2.5, 2.6
2.8 The Derivative as a Function 2.8 2, 5, 9, 13, 17, 25, 27, 29, 35, 37, 43, 47
3.1 Derivatives of Polynomials and Exponential Functions 3.1 5, 6, 7, 15 - 23 (odd), 31, 49, 53, 65
Oct 5 Fall Break: October 5 – 6
No classes
3.2 The Product and Quotient Rules 3.2 3 - 25 (odd), 44, 49, 51, 54 2.7, 2.8, 3.1
No workshops this week
WeBWorK Set 5
2.7, 2.8, 3.1
3.3 Derivatives of the Trigonometric Functions 3.3 3, 5, 9, 14, 17, 38, 39, 41, 43, 44
Oct 12 Midterm 1: Tuesday, October 13th, 8:00 – 9:15 AM
(covers App. A through section 3.1 on our schedule)
Solutions
3.4 The Chain Rule 3.4 5, 7, 9, 13, 15, 23, 32, 41, 43, 49, 53, 61, 65, 72, 80 3.2, 3.3 WeBWorK Set 6
3.2, 3.3
3.5 Implicit Differentiation 3.5 3, 8, 11, 17, 21, 27, 39, 45, 50, 51, 59, 71
Oct 19 3.6 Derivatives of Logarithmic Functions 3.6 3, 4, 7, 8, 11, 23, 37, 39, 40, 49 3.4, 3.5 WeBWorK Set 7
3.4, 3.5
3.7 Rates of Change in the Natural and Social Sciences 3.7 1, 8, 12, 13, 20, 26, 30
3.8 Exponential Growth and Decay 3.8 3, 7, 9, 12, 15, 19
Oct 26 3.9 Related Rates 3.9 3, 10, 13, 15, 17, 19, 24, 33, 41 3.6, 3.7, 3.8 WeBWorK Set 8
3.6, 3.7, 3.8
3.10 Linear Approximations and Differentials 3.10 2, 5, 11, 22, 23, 25, 27, 35, 39, 41(e)
Nov 2 4.1 Maximum and Minimum Values 4.1 3, 7 - 19 (odd), 31, 34, 39, 50, 55, 59, 63, 70 3.9, 3.10 WeBWorK Set 9
3.9, 3.10
4.2 The Mean Value Theorem 4.2 4, 5, 11, 17, 23, 25
4.3 How Derivatives Affect the Shape of a Graph 4.3 5, 8, 11, 15, 23, 25, 31, 41, 45, 67, 86
Nov 9 Midterm 2: Thursday, November 12, 8:00 – 9:15 AM
(covers sections 3.2 – 3.10 on our schedule)
Solutions
4.4 Indeterminate Forms and L'Hospital's Rule 4.4 5 - 11 (odd), 17 - 23 (odd), 37, 42, 49, 53, 55, 56, 76 4.1, 4.2, 4.3 WeBWorK Set 10
4.1, 4.2, 4.3
4.5 Summary of Curve Sketching 4.5 3, 13, 18, 33, 44
Nov 16 4.7 Optimization Problems 4.7 2, 5, 12, 18, 23, 27, 39, 42, 53 4.4, 4.5 WeBWorK Set 11
4.4, 4.5
4.9 Antiderivatives 4.9 3, 13, 15, 21, 35, 37, 45, 49, 53, 59, 61, 66, 73
Nov 23 5.1 Areas and Distances 5.1 4, 15, 17, 20, 23 No workshops this week WeBWorK Set 12
4.7, 4.9
(Due Tues, Dec 1, at 5 PM)
5.2 The Definite Integral 5.2 1, 5, 7, 19, 29, 33, 35, 36, 42, 43, 47, 49, 54, 55
Thanksgiving Break: November 25 (noon) – 27
No classes
Nov 30 5.2 The Definite Integral 5.2 1, 5, 7, 19, 29, 33, 35, 36, 42, 43, 47, 49, 54, 55 4.7, 4.9, 5.1, 5.2 WeBWorK Set 13
5.1, 5.2
5.3 The Fundamental Theorem of Calculus 5.3 4, 5, 7--17 (odd), 23, 31, 36, 37, 43, 57, 63, 67, 78
5.4 Indefinite Integrals and the Net Change Theorem 5.4 7, 10, 12, 16, 27, 31, 37, 43, 49, 52, 59, 69
Dec 7 5.5 The Substitution Rule 5.5 7, 10, 12, 19, 27, 31, 35, 43, 59, 65, 72, 81 5.3, 5.4, 5.5 WeBWorK Set 14
5.3, 5.4, 5.5
Review
Last day of classes is Friday, December 11
Final Exam: Tuesday, December 15, 4:00 – 7:00 PM
(cumulative)
Review Sheet
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Resources

Extra Help

There are many resources available to you for extra help. Office hours are for YOU, so take advantage of them!

Otherwise, you should attend the TAs' office hours or find help at the Math study hall, which is available in Hylan 1104 at the following times:

CETL also offers drop-in tutoring for this course on Sundays from 4 to 8 p.m. in Carlson.

If you feel that you need more individual help, here is a list of resources in the math department and at the university level.

Collaboration

You are encouraged to work on WeBWorK assignments and study for exams together. As we hope you will discover in your workshops, talking about the material with others and collaborating is an extremely effective way of learning mathematics and solidifying your own understanding. However, using another student's work or an electronic aid to submit your own answers is considered cheating. Furthermore, this will not help you succeed on the exams. You should make sure you fully understand all answers you submit on WeBWorK and worksheets.

Exam Preparation

Practice material will be posted here before the exams. Please note that the instructors are not responsible for the availability or correctness of any solutions. If you have any questions, please ask your instructor, TA, or the math graduate students at Math Study Hall.

Review for Midterm 1 Review for Midterm 2 Review for Final Exam