Charlotte Aten's Homepage


I am a mathematics graduate student at the University of Rochester.
My advisor is Jonathan Pakianathan.

Cirriculum Vitae


Papers

Multiplayer rock-paper-scissors (Algebra Universalis, 2020)
Multiplayer Rock-Paper-Scissors (short paper appearing in the conference proceedings of Algebras and Lattices in Hawaiʻi 2018)
The Topology of Magmas (senior thesis)
Nonnormal Quotients (undergraduate independent study project)
Tiling sets and spectral sets over finite fields (with 2015 REU group at UR)

Code

Github
Bitbucket

Universal algebra and lattice theory lectures (2020 Fall)


Talks

Multiplayer rock-paper-scissors (Binghamton University's Graduate Conference in Algebra and Topology 2020) [Video]
A High School Algebra Problem (SUMS Math Talk 2020 Spring)
More Multiplayer Rock-Paper-Scissors (University of Rochester Graduate Student Seminar 2019 Fall)
Topological Lattices and Book Spaces (Binghamton University's Graduate Conference in Algebra and Topology 2018)
Classifying Topological Magmas (University of Rochester Graduate Student Seminar 2018 Fall)
Multiplayer Rock-Paper-Scissors (Algebras and Lattices in Hawaiʻi 2018)
Multiplayer Rock-Paper-Scissors (University of Rochester Graduate Student Seminar 2018 Spring)
Universal Algebra and Boolean Semilattices (Binghamton University's Graduate Conference in Algebra and Topology 2017)
A Brief Introduction to Universal Algebra (University of Rochester Graduate Student Seminar 2017 Fall)
The Topology of Magmas (Senior thesis presentation)
Relational Structures as Directed Hypergraphs (Nebraska Conference for Undergraduate Women in Mathematics 2017)
The Topology of Magmas (National Conference on Undergraduate Research 2016)
Topological Algebra: On Viewing Operations as Simplicial Complexes (National Conference for McNair Scholars 2016)
Constructions of Geometric Objects Encoding Algebraic Structures (David T. Kearns Center Research Symposium 2015)

Teaching

MTH 162 Calculus IIA (2020 Summer)

Art

Fractals
Automata

Humor

A proof that everything can be described using mathematics: Recall that mathematics is the study of abstract relationships. Suppose towards a contradiction that there is some thing, say A, which is not describable in terms of math. "X is not describable in terms of Y" is a relationship between X and Y. We have then exhibited a relationship between A and math, which is a mathematical descriptor of A, contradicting our assumption that A was not amenable to such descriptions.

Contact

charlotte.aten@rochester.edu
Office: 910 Hylan Building